One Helpful Tip to Inspire and Motivate Others

Motivating others to change can be a difficult task at times. You may bump up against people who are resistant to change, who are content where they are or who simply don’t see the benefit or value in making a move in another direction.

Inspiring others to take action is easy when you know how to approach the situation. One of the primary differences between someone who can inspire others and someone who can’t is their perspective.

Watch this video to learn one helpful tip to inspire and motivate others. When you’ve finished watching the video, Tweet out one tip you learned from the video and be sure to tag me – @Steven_Gaffney – so that I can see the benefit you saw in motivating others.


Create Moments of Honesty Every Day

Last week I was invited to appear on Good Day DC to celebrate National Honesty Day. We had a great conversation about honesty and the impact it has on both personal and professional relationships.

Here are just a few of the things that we talked about during the interview:

  • Why the unsaid is often more harmful than the things that are being said
  • The reason the “sandwich method”, often used to deliver criticism, is manipulative and what to do instead
  • Why appreciation is something we need to practice on a much more regular basis

Although National Honesty Day is now behind us, we want to encourage you to create moments of honesty every day. Getting the unsaid said, appreciating each other more and being honest in our communication will lead to more successful relationships and business interactions.

Watch the interview and, once you’ve had a chance to tune in, Tweet your thoughts to me at @Steven_Gaffney with the hashtag #HonestyEveryDay.


National Honesty Day, April 30th

National Honesty Day brings us a healthy reminder to examine your current level of honesty. This holiday challenges people to evaluate just how honest they are.

Lying is not just about making false statements. It also encompasses everything that is conveniently left out, avoided or withheld. In my nearly 20 years’ experience advising top government leaders and Fortune 500 executives on increasing the bottom line through open, honest communication, I have seen the mounting costs of such withholding.

A survey of 1,000 adults reported in James Paterson and Peter Kim’s book, “The Day America told the Truth,” found that 91% of people lied routinely. I like to add that the other 9% probably lied when surveyed.

Open, honest communication is often the antidote to the hidden costly problems that inhibit organizations’ teamwork, collaboration, innovation and growth. This National Honesty Day, try it out. Discover the opportunities honest communication brings in both your professional and personal life.

If you struggle from withholding the truth, there are a few things you can do to change your behavior and in turn change your life. I invite you to take that challenge today, National Honesty Day, in discovering the hidden truths in your life.

Watch this video clip from Fox News for practical advice on how to incorporate more honesty in your relationships, company or work place.

I’d also love to hear from you on Twitter or over on our Facebook page. I want to know how your honesty day went and what you learned from it.


Dan Rivers Radio Show

In recent weeks, I have been invited to do a number of radio interviews. In my latest interview, which is embedded below, I discuss a variety of topics; from the government shutdown, to how to facilitate more honest communication in the workplace, and what leaders can do to move their organizations forward. Enjoy the interview below:

Keep me posted of your feedback.


Five Essential Keys to Rebuilding Trust in Today’s Political Environment

The foundation of all relationships is trust. When trust is lost, it functions like a sinkhole – it takes down everything else with it! In today’s environment, it seems that many of our typical ways of doing business and ways things have been done in the past have been lost. Trust is hard to build and easy to lose. Unfortunately, in today’s political environment, it seems that trust has crumbled and almost been lost entirely.

Congress is at a 5% approval rating which begs the question, “Who are those five percent?” I think that when you ask most Americans, we have lost trust in many of our elected officials and their ability to do the jobs we elected them to do. The good news is that there is a path forward that is applicable not only to our politicians, but to all of us in our everyday lives to help us rebuild trust. The following are five essential keys to rebuilding broken trust:

  1.  We need to constantly be talking to one another. You can’t just have one conversation with someone and expect to have trust; trust is built through multiple conversations. You can’t go to the gym once and expect to be healthy; you need to go multiple times. You also build trust through transparency and by taking with each other, not at each other.
  2. We need to have honest, open communication. The biggest problem when it comes to honesty is not what people do say to each other, but what they don’t say. For example, politicians need to share the actual truth that they are afraid to alienate certain parts of their party. They are scared they will not be re-elected and if they compromise, it will show weakness.  However in reality, the ability to compromise shows strength.
  3. We need to hit “reboot” and begin to discuss what we have in common as the building block to move forward.
  4. We need to create a plan that actually shows we will not find ourselves in our current situation in the future.
  5. We need to make sure that there are consequences to prove our commitment to rebuilding trust. We need to reward the right behaviors, not the wrong ones.

With these five keys, we can take the very difficult situation that our country is currently in and make it a better tomorrow. Hopefully this is a wake-up call for us all to make sure we have elected officials who understand that trust is critical, are willing to do what it takes to keep that trust trust, and have the courage and strength of character to do what’s best for our country. Having worked with many corporations, associations, and government agencies, I have come to realize that no matter how dire certain situations may be, with the right leadership anything can be overcome. The key question is “What are we willing to do about it?”